The Perfect Playlist

It is my personal belief that the music of a dance class can completely make or break the class. Anyone who has ever taught classes for me knows that I place a huge emphasis on choosing the best music for the class they’re teaching. I believe that the music chosen for a dance class should fit the style of the instructor, be chosen with the students in mind, have appropriate lyrics (or be instrumental or beats only!), fit with the actual moves/steps/combinations/technique that will be taught in class, be enjoyable for parents or any community observers, and generally aid in creating the desired atmosphere that the instructors wants to create for that specific class.

I have found that if I choose my music wisely, my lesson plan nearly writes itself. I will talk about that more soon in some projects that I am working on, but I really believe that’s true! (Anyone else choose the music before deciding what your students are actually going to do in class?)

With these thoughts in mind, I’ve decided to focus on music in The Happy Dance Blog this week! I’m kicking it off with my Perfect Playlist Formula, which you can remember with the letters H-A-P-P-Y!

Be sure to head over to DanceEdStartup.com and grab this week’s blog FREEBIE!

Making Space for Creativity in Your Dance Class

It’s okay to sometimes be a little uncomfortable when you’re teaching. This might sound surprising to some, but it is a fact that I’ve found to be true. I have found this sentiment to be most true when I am working to allow space for creativity in my dance class. Now that I’ve said that, let me give you a little background.

As an elementary teacher for 6 years now, I have spent several years working to find my teacher voice, establish my authority in the classroom, develop my warm/strict mechanisms, and to really just own the idea that I am the “expert in the room” (a validating phrase that I heard frequently at one organization where I taught for two years). But with all of that, sometimes we forget about allowing kids to create. We forget about all of the detailed lessons based in the theory of constructivism that we developed while training to become educators. We forget to make space for our students to experiment, take calculated risks, and to build in their own learning environment.

Also, besides forgetting, sometimes we just get comfortable. We get into a groove, our students enjoy it, we get positive feedback and no complaints (classroom teaching heaven, am I right?), and we decide to not fix what isn’t broken. The problem with that is: stagnation. I believe I heard recently on one of the podcasts that I listen to: “If you’re not growing, you’re dying.” Call us dramatic if you want to, but I’d bet that for most of us creatives, not moving or making causes us to feel like there’s a piece of us that isn’t really living. (#createordie)

Since we artists, educators, and creators have the intention to always be growing, learning, and making, we have to allow our students to do the same. We have to let them discover the joy that comes from ideating, making, and re-making.

So, let’s get uncomfortable. Sometimes, this can be as simple as adding a song to your class that fits within your lesson plan, theme, or unit, but that might not give you the desire to move in a way that is comfortable for you. It could be as simple as slowing down or speeding up the tempo to a piece, changing the direction of a movement, or releasing some control during a portion of class and passing the ownership of the learning completely to your students.

When you allow yourself to be uncomfortable and force yourself to create in an unfamiliar space, you are modeling successfully working through unfamiliar experiences to your students. You are encouraging problem-solving. You are demonstrating new ways to compose dance using various movement elements. You might even simultaneously challenge and empower your students to trust their skills, in movement and in life, even when the unexpected occurs. And, in the process, you might remind yourself that you have the power to do the same.

Cheers to the discomfort! Let’s keep creating.